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The Plan of the Ancient Stadium

The track of the Stadium was approximately 230 metres long and 32 metres wide. Its length was 600 Roman feet equaling the Roman measure for one stade. Since its width is comparatively small, the track was not used for horse races. The Northern part has curved form and is called sfendona. The track itself was three-layered, the finishing one being mortar.

The Fortification walls – After his seizure of the city in 342 BC, Philip II undertook the construction of solid defensive walls. The very first of them were constructed in Cyclopean masonry technique with syenite solid blocks laid dry. Ancient citizens were able to reach Maritza river through steep stairs hewn into the rocks of the northern slope of Nebet-tepe (The Hill of the Sentinel). These stairs are still to be seen today.

The Aqueduct - Philippopolis was well provided with water by means of a couple of aqueducts and one water-distributing installation of clay pipes. Exhibited sections of one of the aqueducts, once 6 kilometres long, can be seen today. The size of its foundations varied between 2.16 metres and 4.55 metres in length and between 2 metres and 3.5 metres in width. It distributed water from the Bunardjik Hill to Sahat Tepe (The Hill of the Clock Tower) and Nebet Tepe (The Hill of the Sentinel). Both of the aqueducts transferred 43 000 cubic metres of water and satisfied all needs of the ancient city.

A Covered ancient street - A covered passage was found under the sfentona (the curved part to the North). It turned out to be an ancient covered street leading into a space 15 metres wide and 5 metres high. The floor of this street is paved with syenite blocks covering a masonry canal draining the track of the Stadium. The street is considered to have played a significant role in the urban planning of the city. One of the hypotheses for its function is that it started Via Sagularis – the main street circling around the city right next to the path of the defense wall, yet on the inside. Another of the hypotheses suggests that the street led to a tower or a opening in the defense wall. Unfortunately, investigation and historical artifacts are insufficient for archaeologists to come up with a firm conclusion.

The track – The track was approximately 230 metres long and 32 metres wide. Its length was 600 Roman feet equaling the Roman measure for one stade. Since its width is comparatively small, the track was not used for horse races. The Northern part has curved form and is called sfendona. The track itself was three-layered, the finishing one being mortar.